O Come Let Us Adore Him

Eucharistic Adoration at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C. Photo: Fr. Lawrence Lew, O.P.
Eucharistic Adoration at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C.
Photo: Fr. Lawrence Lew, O.P.

“During the early phases of the reform, the inherent relationship between Mass and adoration of the Blessed Sacrament was not always perceived with sufficient clarity. For example, an objection that was widespread at the time argued that the eucharistic bread was given to us not to be looked at, but to be eaten. In the light of the Church’s experience of prayer, however, this was seen to be a false dichotomy. As Saint Augustine put it: “nemo autem illam carnem manducat, nisi prius adoraverit; peccemus non adorando – no one eats that flesh without first adoring it; we should sin were we not to adore it.” In the Eucharist, the Son of God comes to meet us and desires to become one with us; eucharistic adoration is simply the natural consequence of the eucharistic celebration, which is itself the Church’s supreme act of adoration. Receiving the Eucharist means adoring him whom we receive. Only in this way do we become one with him, and are given, as it were, a foretaste of the beauty of the heavenly liturgy. The act of adoration outside Mass prolongs and intensifies all that takes place during the liturgical celebration itself. Indeed, “only in adoration can a profound and genuine reception mature. And it is precisely this personal encounter with the Lord that then strengthens the social mission contained in the Eucharist, which seeks to break down not only the walls that separate the Lord and ourselves, but also and especially the walls that separate us from one another.”” – Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI

This photo of the Most Blessed Sacrament was taken during Adoration at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C.

Photo Credit: Fr. Lawrence Lew, O.P. (English Province)